Sunday, January 15, 2017

This is How Providers Can Make Social Media a Relevant Strategy

“Nobody knows what they are doing” Ricky Gervais
“But it doesn’t have to be that way.” Mike Krivich

Those comments hit the mark regarding social media and providers.  What I see happening, except for a few isolated cases, are providers caught in learning loops for social media. More study, for more understanding in a process eerily similar to the strategic paralysis by analysis process that so many providers experience. Learning and analyzing the newest developments and fearing the future instead of embracing and driving change.

Social media represents a great opportunity for establishing a one-on-one relationship with the patient, aka the healthcare consumer, directed by the healthcare organization that breaks from the pack, by creating a social media healthcare experience that is memorable, exceeding an individual or families experience and expectations.

Most healthcare organizations are still stumbling with using social media and the online experience to drive differentiation, meaningful information, and expertise.   Think of this regarding a channel of communications and engagement that meets the healthcare consumer on their terms but with your messaging.

Social media is about branded content that uses pull-logic marketing instead of push-logic marketing.

In any case, when you look at your social media strategy and presence, does your social media experience:
  
 Ø  Delight your customer?   
Ø  Create sustainable differentiation? 
Ø  Is adaptable to new opportunities? 
Ø  Leverages your investment? 
Ø  Deliver in every situation? 
Ø  Connect with the newly insured? 
Ø  Does it engage the healthcare, consumer? 
Ø  Provide answers or guidance for those looking for solutions to medical challenges? 
Ø  Define experience, outcomes, price and value?

Or, is it just pushing out information that you have deemed valuable to you, but carries neither relevancy in the market nor addressing unmet needs?

The lens of honesty and critical evaluation is needed to evaluate social media efforts objectively.  If the social media program is not doing these things, then chances are nil in delivering an exceptional social media experience. 

Make your social and online presence not just "good enough" because we are still learning, but unique, by putting that learning into action.

And on another social media note.

Physician liaisons: 90% of providers are on social media - are you? Deborah Scheetz, physician relations professional, shares best practices on building physician relations through Facebook. Start connecting now!  This short video on YouTube by Deborah can be very helpful. 






Deborah can also be found on  LinkedIn  at  https://www.linkedin.com/in/deborah-scheetz-msc-999a564

Michael is a healthcare marketing business, marketing, and communications strategist and thought leader.  As an internationally followed healthcare marketing strategy blogger, his blog, Healthcare Marketing Matters receives over 20,000 page views a month and read in 52 countries.  He is a Fellow, American College of Healthcare Executives, Professional Certified Marketer, American Marketing Association and HubSpot Academy- Email Marketing, Inbound Marketing & Inbound Sales Certified. Post opinions are my own.


For more topics and thought leading discussions like this, join his group, Healthcare Marketing Leaders For Change, a LinkedIn Professional Group.

Sunday, January 8, 2017

How You Can Market Providers in Healthcare 2.0

When one looks across providers delivering healthcare and the marketing, one has to wonder if there is an understanding of the importance of marketing in healthcare 2.0. Which begs the question, will big box hospitals have a chance of surviving in a highly competitive, efficient retail medical marketplace without clear and unambiguous marketing?

After all, it's already apparent, even though hospital and health system leadership have their heads in the sand, that the consumer only needs you for three things:  emergency care; intensive care and care for acute complex, medical conditions.

 And here’s a new one, physicians don't need the hospital or health system either.

Healthcare 2.0 is a market animal that is completely different than anything Hospital leadership has ever had to contend.  And this animal has teeth with little regard for whether a hospital or health system survives. Highly competitive, innovative and retail in nature, the sole focus is on understanding and meeting the needs of the healthcare consumer.  Note this importance of that sentence.  It’s focused on addressing the needs of the healthcare consumer, not the hospital or health system.

That implies that the hospital or health system evolves from being in the hospital business forever in search of a revenue stream to a healthcare business model that meets the needs of the healthcare consumer regardless of clinical service, time, and place.

What is healthcare marketing’s role? These five will determine growth and success. Failure to change means you are looking at joining the growing pile of the ash heap of history.

1.       Voice of the Customer

VoC is far more important now in healthcare.  There are over 147 healthcare consumer and patient touch-points in the typical hospital.  Each interaction is the opportunity to hear about organizational performance.  Then most importantly is the ability to use that information in an actionable way to identify and meet healthcare consumer needs. 

2.       Using market data to manage the patient experience and engagement

Patient experience and engagement mean just that- not one isolated clinical or administrative service experience but understanding what that patient experience is at all touch points.  Next is the challenge of managing that experience to its fullest potential for the benefit of the patient and the organization. Patient experience is an integrative process across the entire organization internally and externally.  The rallying cry in any hospital should be one view of the patient, one patient view of the organization. 

3.       From demand generation to demand management

The hospital is no longer the center of the healthcare universe.   Marketing needs to understand what the demand for health care services will be, when required and manage service demand in making sure that the hospital or health system has the right resources, in the right place, at the right time to meet demand.  The days are rapidly slipping away where marketing will be driving demand to fill hospital beds. They will drive demand to the appropriate place and location of service. 

4.       Preparing the hospital for enhanced competition

It’s sad but true; providers continue to fall behind non-traditional providers and new entrants into the market. Hospitals are losing share and revenue to others.  There are many reasons for this, but the most striking is the inability of traditional providers to connect the dots through technology, data and an in-depth understanding of the healthcare consumer to meet their needs.   It’s about the capacity to have the market research and internal data to draw actionable insights to meet the healthcare consumer’s needs and competition. 

Is it any wonder why non-traditional competitors are leading the way and taking revenue and share from providers?  Their deep understanding of the consumer and the dynamics of price, choice, convenience, experience and engagement give these companies and others an edge that providers are missing. 

5.       From outbound features and  interruptive marketing, to inbound value solutions marketing

Value marketing is making the case to the healthcare consumer how you are solving their medical problem, offering a solution, giving results and even making them happy.  Value marketing is about a creative exchange between people and organizations in the marketplace.   It is a dynamic transaction that continually changes based on the needs of the individual compared to what the healthcare provider has to offer.

In the end, it’s all about giving the consumer what they want not what the provider wants. That is healthcare 2.0. Welcome to the new marketing reality.

Michael is a healthcare marketing business, marketing, and communications strategist and thought leader.  As an internationally followed healthcare marketing strategy blogger, his blog, Healthcare Marketing Matters receives over 20,000 page views a month and read in 52 countries.  He is a Fellow, American College of Healthcare Executives, Professional Certified Marketer, American Marketing Association and HubSpot Academy- Email Marketing, Inbound Marketing & Inbound Sales Certified. Post opinions are my own.


For more topics and thought leading discussions like this, join his group, Healthcare Marketing Leaders For Change, a LinkedIn Professional Group.

Sunday, December 18, 2016

The Best of Healthcare Marketing Matters - 2016

With so much market and regulatory change driving uncertainty in 2016 for health care vendor and provider marketing, it’s still been a remarkable year.  Even in the midst of market transformation, some things remain valid. 

Focus on the customer. Be transparent and responsive. Develop new programs and service based on the needs of your audience, not what you desire.  And use the social media channels where the healthcare consumer is at to drive engagement and experience, not where you want them to be.

I would like to thank everyone for taking the time to read, comment, and share what I have written across a broad range of healthcare marketing topics for 2016. Because of you the reader, by the end of 2016, HMM will go over 100,000 total page views for the year across 52 countries. 

I am taking a couple of weeks off from writing for the Holidays. I need to recharge, relax and enjoy the downtime.  I will be back right before the New Year begins ready to roll.

Have a great Holiday season and best wishes for prosperity and success in 2017.

Best regards,
Michael J Krivich, FACHE. PCM

Views   Title

2,710    Chief Communications Officers in health systems, advocates, and publishers? http://bit.ly/1MD4Rmt

2,618    Why should a provider switch to Inbound Marketing?

2,548    But nobody knows who the hospital is marketing!

2,525    Is the disintermediation of hospitals a market reality?

2.494    Communicating Value is The New Hospital Marketing Currency.   

2,451    Time for Hospital Physician Advertisements to Change?

2,430    Is Now The Time For Patient Experience Provider Advertising?

2,392    Improving the Physician Hospital Experience, Untapped Revenue &  Growth?     http://bit.ly/1X77jVI

2,010    Providers- Is it time to stop learning about social media and finally use it? http://bit.ly/2a5FVS5

1,731    Social selling for the healthcare vendor, if not now, when?

1,432   Social selling in healthcare takes work and commitment. Can you?

Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. 

Michael is a healthcare marketing business, marketing, and communications strategist and thought leader.  As an internationally followed healthcare marketing strategy blogger, his blog, Healthcare Marketing Matters receives over 20,000 page views a month and read in 52 countries.  He is a Fellow, American College of Healthcare Executives, Professional Certified Marketer, American Marketing Association and HubSpot Academy- Email Marketing, Inbound Marketing & Inbound Sales Certified. Post opinions are my own.

For more topics and thought leading discussions like this, join his group, Healthcare Marketing Leaders For Change, a LinkedIn Professional Group.


Sunday, December 11, 2016

Is social media use by the individual, nothing more than an echo chamber?

Given all that has taken place in 2016 with social media, it occurred to me that maybe social media use by the consumer, not business mind you, is nothing more than an echo chamber.

What do I mean by that?

I mean that in the final analysis, people will tend to connect with those family members, friends, and strangers that share like convictions, beliefs, and political affiliations for example.  In that environment, political beliefs, news stories, etc. that reflect their view of the world become shared. 

Never mind that the source of the news or open is created by a fake news source. It got a life of its own and shared across the social media channels of the circle that shares that same perception or belief.  

There is little room for differing opinion or facts that are incongruent with the understanding or attitudes leading to a loss of critical thinking and examination. The potential exists for manipulation by various groups and organizations with little accountability that can slant the facts to fit the narrative.

Now that being said, that is what business use of social media entails. Find these groups to sell product or services.  A topic we are not considering today.

But the bigger question here is, does social media as an echo chamber benefit society and improve the culture and discourse? 

I would say that the answer to that question is no. If anything, individual’s use of social media within that echo chamber will drive more division, disruption, and polarization. We all lose when the discussion becomes one-sided, and people only see their opinion as being the only truth.

In the end, it still comes down to the individual’s sense of responsibility and accountability. And the ability to think for themselves critically while understanding that someone disagreeing with you is healthy. It does open up one to new ideas and viewpoints not considered. 

Is that such a bad thing?

I don’t know what’s going to happen. Will others will begin to realize that social media across the world is becoming nothing more than an echo chamber, leading to increased polarization of thought, ideas and fostering a lack of critical thinking? 

For that, we are worse off as a society and civilization.  Lemmings running to fall off the cliff from which there may be no return.

Remember:


Michael is a healthcare marketing business, marketing, and communications strategist and thought leader.  As an internationally followed healthcare marketing strategy blogger, his blog, Healthcare Marketing Matters receives over 20,000 page views a month and read in 52 countries.  He is a Fellow, American College of Healthcare Executives, Professional Certified Marketer, American Marketing Association and HubSpot Academy- Email Marketing, Inbound Marketing & Inbound Sales Certified. Post opinions are my own.
For more topics and thought leading discussions like this, join his group, Healthcare Marketing Leaders For Change, a LinkedIn Professional Group.


Tags: #hcmkt, #hcsm, #socialmedia #understanding #responsibility