Saturday, November 26, 2016

If social media is quasi-immortality, what will your legacy be?

It’s been said that once something is on the IoT, it’s there forever.  Facebook, Snapchat, Instagram, Pinterest, Tumbler, LinkedIn and so many other social media channels and platform, means that there is a lot of stuff you have written, photographed and shared.  In the totality of it all, what does that say about you?

If you were to die tomorrow and someone who never knew you stumbled upon your musings, political views, photographs, etc. friends, group memberships, etc., what does that say about you?

Will you be seen as thoughtful and understanding, or kind and generous?  Someone who cares and listens to discusses thoughtfully. A loving and caring person who values life in all of its diversity and beauty? A friend who reaches out to make things better?

Do you see yourself as the defender of all that is good and judge everyone else’s politics and views as of little consequence?  Are you seen as intransigent and unforgiving?  Would you be by a future generation as a racist, or someone who is harsh and judgmental?  

Could you be seen under the bright lights of the future and their lens of historical hindsight as uncivilized and a barbarian?

We will never know the answer to any of those questions.  But we do know today is that what we share, post, photograph, etc. speaks to who we are as individuals for the historical record. Our history of the potential immortality for you and me  resides on the Internet of Things.

Words are important, and that is something that I can think we can all agree. How one uses words not only in the content but contextually, can significantly influence our record of immortality.

Words can drive an individual to take action, become motivated, inspire and in some cases by the contextual environment communicated with the phrase become life-changing. And we all know that words can unintentionally by use and connotation reach a pretty high giggle factor, raising more questions than answers. In some case, words conveying a position on a topic become oxymoronic resulting in a negative image. Words can drive hate.

With that in mind, how would you rate your use of words and your interactions on the IoT?
What is the legacy of who you are that you are leaving behind?

An important question that only you can answer. 

Life and what we leave behind for others about ourselves is important.

Words matter.

Michael is a healthcare marketing business, marketing, and communications strategist and thought leader.  As an internationally followed healthcare marketing strategy blogger, his blog, Healthcare Marketing Matters receives over 20,000 page views a month and read in 52 countries.  He is a Fellow, American College of Healthcare Executives, Professional Certified Marketer, American Marketing Association and HubSpot Academy- Email Marketing, Inbound Marketing & Inbound Sales Certified. Post opinions are my own.


For more topics and thought leading discussions like this, join his group, Healthcare Marketing Leaders For Change, a LinkedIn Professional Group.

Sunday, November 13, 2016

Is the lack of self-control in social media descending us into darkness?

That’s an important question for today’s world.  And let me be clear, I am not blaming the channels in social media but only posting a question. 

Is social media the new herd mentality?

Are we losing the ability to understand?

Have we lost the ability to be tolerant?

Can we regain the ability to find the good in others?

Is it possible to listen for understanding and not just hear to respond?

What happened to the two sides of the same coin understanding?

I am neither wise enough or have enough hubris even to try to answer these questions.

But that never stopped me before.

Words are important, and that is something that I can think we can all agree. How one uses words not only in the content but contextually, can significantly influence a positive or negative perception of the issue.

Words can drive an individual to take action, become motivated, inspire and in some cases by the contextual environment communicated with the phrase become life-changing. And we all know that words can unintentionally by use and connotation reach a pretty high giggle factor, raising more questions than answers. In some case, words conveying a position on a topic become oxymoronic resulting in a negative image. Words can drive hate.

With that in mind, how would you rate your use of words?

An important question as I see more each day of individuals using words that don’t say anything.  Lots of squiggles on a page intended to convey information but mostly say the same thing over and over again.  I increasingly see the use of opinion based jargon instead of facts to cover up any real meaning. 

Do we have the ability to understand, think twice and write once?

Words matter.

Michael is a healthcare marketing business, marketing, and communications strategist and thought leader.  As an internationally followed healthcare marketing strategy blogger, his blog, Healthcare Marketing Matters receives over 20,000 page views a month and read in 52 countries.  He is a Fellow, American College of Healthcare Executives, Professional Certified Marketer, American Marketing Association and HubSpot Academy- Email Marketing, Inbound Marketing & Inbound Sales Certified. Post opinions are my own.

For more topics and thought leading discussions like this, join his group, Healthcare Marketing Leaders For Change, a LinkedIn Professional Group. 

Sunday, November 6, 2016

The Grades Are In & Providers Receive an F in Consumer/Patient Engagement

And this from a well-respected healthcare executive in a comment to one of my blog posts, which I have permission to use.

“Michael - I think a lot of folks that are responsible for securing their health insurance would benefit from more emphasis on #7 on your list. My family has been with Cigna as our insurer and big Baylor in Dallas as our main provider for years. Now we are getting letters from Cigna telling us they will no longer be offering us the same plan in the coming year. We feel abandoned at this point. Both of these companies know us well. I would feel better if they would access some of their data and reach out to us proactively with options for us going forward that would allow us to maintain an ongoing relationship with both of them. Right now I feel like neither of them really want us as customers anymore.”

What doesn’t hospital and health system leadership get about engagement with healthcare consumers and patients?

I would like to think that this is an anomaly, but deep down inside this kind of story happens every day in the very corner of the nation.  All the while hospitals and health systems tell the consumer and patients how much they care about them. What significant awards for medical care from third parties bestowed upon them?  How great they are and you should come there for no valid reason other than we say so. 

You know the song sung every day in the meaningless provider marketing that takes place.

Healthcare leadership has failed to understand the changing healthcare marketplace, their role in that market, consumer needs and how to engage.  They believe their press clippings and advertisements. All the while cognitive dissonance is occurring with consumers and patient who know that the reality does meet the experience.

And you all know that I have been writing about our engagement and experience for years now. As a sample, the following posts on Healthcare Marketing Matters have received thousands of page views. You can always use the search function to find much, much more. But it’s clear; providers aren’t paying attention.

Is healthcare consumer/ patient engagement all of the time the new reality? http://bit.ly/1VoF01N

Is healthcare consumer or patient engagement the new sales? http://bit.ly/1LFgdkx

Can healthcare providers become customer focused enterprises? http://bit.ly/1COdz7c

What is the healthcare consumer to do? http://bit.ly/1wPeDKm

The healthcare consumer has a buyer’s market now, how will providers respond? http://bit.ly/1NGedZK

What does a customer focused hospital or healthcare enterprise look like? http://bit.ly/1Hy6O09

The healthcare consumer lives in a multichannel environment; the response is? http://bit.ly/1CwCLOe

Patient engagement or patient relationship, can you have one without the other? http://bit.ly/1RGR0em

Is social media the next level of patient engagement? http://bit.ly/1mPF1gs

I am not going to dwell on the what and how to do of engagement, as that topic has been covered time and again.

I do chuckle as a primary health system that I have been going to for over 20 years has been boasting of a great CRM system for several years now.  The system hospital has ever engaged neither I nor any family members in any meaningful way. I know you, but you have no clue about me.  And I can choose to go elsewhere because you know why- providers are all the same.

Providers are failing the engagement test of healthcare consumers and patients. At what point does this finally sink in? 

When this happens, the last person out of the hospital, please turn the lights off.

That's why you engage all of the time. 

Michael is a healthcare marketing business, marketing, and communications strategist and thought leader.  As an internationally followed healthcare marketing strategy blogger, his blog, Healthcare Marketing Matters receives over 20,000 page views a month and read in 52 countries.  He is a Fellow, American College of Healthcare Executives, Professional Certified Marketer, American Marketing Association and HubSpot Academy- Email Marketing, Inbound Marketing & Inbound Sales Certified. Post opinions are my own.

For more topics and thought leading discussions like this, join his group, Healthcare Marketing Leaders For Change, a LinkedIn Professional Group.

Sunday, October 30, 2016

How does one make provider marketing meaningful?

A crucial question because the answer is, that one only needs a hospital for three things anymore- emergency care, ICU, and treatment for complex acute medical conditions.  The hospital as the center of the healthcare universe is an antiquated business model.  That is how fast the market has changed in three years.

While traditional approaches and messaging to marketing the hospital and health system continue unabated, the healthcare consumer is left scratching their head since its looks and feels so much the same for all the hospitals’  in a market.

While the healthcare consumer wants quality data, the hospitals look and turn away.

When the healthcare consumer asks for pricing information is the provider answer rude and arrogant that you’ll never understand our prices so why to bother?  

When the healthcare consumer tweets about a bad experience, silence echoes in the hallway.

And that is the core of the challenge.

Hospitals continue to be deaf to the changes and need of the market.

The healthcare consumer is searching for information on the hospital or health system that includes brand reputation, price and outcomes data, and experience to make a health care purchase decision.  They are finding the information elsewhere. What they are finding doesn’t match with the message. 

And that doesn’t foster or create trust.

Health care is a retail-driven, consumer-focused medical market and that means new approaches.  A new transparency based on price, outcomes and the value that the healthcare consumer receives. It’s not about logos, awards, vague claims or misleading advertisements. It is about being healthcare consumer focused and meeting their needs with usable, transparent, and actionable information, not hospital- centric messaging that makes the Board, physicians and senior management feel good.

It’s a new business model for hospital and health system operations and marketing.

In most cases, healthcare advertisements and other channel communications are the primary contacts that a consumer has that start the experience process.   Talk to the audience in meaningful ways. Educate. Teach. Inform. Change opinion.  Frame the experience and set up the clinical service or physician by providing actionable information in terms the healthcare consumer can understand.

Winning healthcare marketers are driving growth by increasing their precision, broadening their scope, reacting quickly, and being transparent by telling a better story.

Otherwise, last one out, please turn the lights out.

Michael is a healthcare marketing business, marketing, and communications strategist and thought leader.  As an internationally followed healthcare marketing strategy blogger, his blog, Healthcare Marketing Matters receives over 20,000 page views a month and read in 52 countries.  He is a Fellow, American College of Healthcare Executives, Professional Certified Marketer, American Marketing Association and HubSpot Academy- Email Marketing, Inbound Marketing & Inbound Sales Certified. Post opinions are my own.


For more topics and thought leading discussions like this, join his group, Healthcare Marketing Leaders For Change, a LinkedIn Professional Group.