Sunday, June 25, 2017

The Consumers Buying Journey & Hospitals, the Marketing Starting Point

As the provider market for the healthcare consumer continues to consolidate through merger, acquisition, liquidation or disintermediation, there is one clear outcome. Fewer providers mean heightened competition within hospitals or health systems in a bid to stay atop the food chain. With the consumer's growing realization that they need a hospital for only three things, the ER, ICU and medical care for complex acute medical conditions, they are more in control with their physician of the buying process than providers want to admit.

To become part of the consumers choice for healthcare, successful providers will recognize that understanding the healthcare consumer buyers journey is the new way of thinking about marketing, how it impacts growth and can drive the organization in a better direction that is more customer-focused and responsive to their needs.

 Customer Buyer Journey

In this environment, providers are already losing meaningful differentiation. Marketing campaigns for example with messaging that we care more, we have the best facilities, we have the best technology, or better yet, our doctors care more, are meaningless when the data available shows most care is too expensive and average at best.  In essence, all hospitals and health systems do the same thing. How they communicate with little variations on features and benefits across the continuum of care may be different, but still at its most basic level are substantially the same. 

Of course, brand reputation can be a powerful influencer but where some providers struggle is when they don’t have a considerable brand reputation or more than basic customer understanding. Just because you have developed personas doesn’t mean that you fully understand the customer or their buying journey.

Now that being said, this discussion is not for the highly successful hospitals or health systems that are already using buyer’s maps and building customer evangelists along the way. In successful hospitals marketing is highly integrated, and leadership has set the strategy, vision and executes on a nonnegotiable customer-first strategy. But when you find one tell me!

What is the change that is required?

The requirement is to move from an overreliance on features and benefits marketing to an organizational customer focused culture and strategy. The marketing operation becomes highly integrated and shifts to inbound marketing. Marketing’s job is now to provide the right content, at the right time, in the right healthcare context during the customer's buying journey.

Influencing the costumer’s journey is about highly effective marketing.

When hospital marketing understands the buying processes, then marketing becomes far more useful. Marketing moves from putting the heads in the beds or focused on brand or image in the hopes that they are not resources, to a defined process that enhances growth.

Next steps

Creating a buyers map takes time and resources. Let me be clear that this is some heavy lifting needs to happen. No shortcuts are allowed.

There are many different ways to map and a search on the IoT will provide one with all the templates necessary. But at a minimum, the following information is essential to the process and understanding.  Keep a singular focus as one gathers information on the buyer stages of Awareness, Consideration, and Decision. 
1.       Initial moments that lead to the first contact. 
2.       Process steps the buyers take and conversations they engage in to find solutions. 
3.       The flow of the process steps and experiences leading up to purchase. 
4.       Items associated with purchase and consumption.  
5.       Ongoing experience and reactions to the purchase.

After all, if you want to survive, thrive and grow in turbulent shrinking markets, then you must understand the healthcare consumer, aka the patient and the buyer's journey like never before.

Michael is a healthcare marketing business, marketing, and communications strategist and thought leader.  As an internationally followed healthcare marketing strategy blogger, his blog, Healthcare Marketing Matters receives over 20,000 page views a month and read in 52 countries.  He is a Fellow, American College of Healthcare Executives, Professional Certified Marketer, American Marketing Association and HubSpot Academy- Email Marketing, Inbound Marketing & Inbound Sales Certified. Post opinions are my own.

For more topics and thought leading discussions like this, join his group, Healthcare Marketing Leaders For Change, a LinkedIn Professional Group.

Sunday, June 11, 2017

What is wrong with this health systems marketing?

And it’s not a quiz either.

I try extremely hard not to call out individual hospitals or health systems for their lack of understanding of the healthcare consumer, their expectations, needs and for knowing who their patient is.

But sometimes the professional healthcare marketer in me gets the best of me when I receive some marketing material from a health system, through different incarnations, I have used for 22 plus years. That’s right 22 plus years.  Oh, and did I mention that my wife, children, and mother-in-law have used them too?

PH has no idea after 22 years of utilization from being a patient, using the ER, to outpatient testing,  WHO. I. AM.

And here is what set me off. And I can guarantee you that many a healthcare consumer, aka former patient, feels the same way.

The other day, I received a direct mail piece. It was a very nicely done, four-color, a heavy stock paper mailer that looked expensive with an offer for a chance to win a fitbit.  But the catch was if and only if, I will schedule an appointment with one of their most caring primary care physicians for a health checkup.

The marketing issues beyond PH for any number of hospitals and health systems is that if  PH had been paying attention, was being strategic in their marketing and messaging and fully understood who their customer was, they would have never sent me the direct mail piece.

Why, because for 22 years I have had a continuous relationship with a primary care doctor who I see regularly and who has me utilize the health system hospital.  With all due respect to Peter Frampton and Humble Pie, “I don’t need no doctor.” And I don't need any employed physician.

In one fell swoop, PH just told me they have no idea who I am. I know who they are from direct experience and utilization, but they are clueless about me, the healthcare consumer.

And in today’s marketing world of more data that you can beat with a stick, the availability of marketing automation, CRMs, experience mapping, the buyer's journey, AI and social media, that is just unacceptable.

It’s not that hard.

In today’s world of healthcare consumer choice where premiums, deductibles, and copays have the healthcare consumer paying for over one-third of the cost of care, hospitals, and health system marketing needs to be far more strategic, targeted, responsive, data-driven, and healthcare consumer oriented. 

There is no reason, no reason at all, not to understand who your audience is and the relationship that they already have built up with you. Understand what the healthcare consumer needs are, how the experience has been and how to communicate through the right channels with the right message, at the right time to build a mutually beneficial relationship.

For all hospitals and health systems out there in the medical-care land, just remember, that the healthcare consumer only needs you for three things- emergency care, intensive care and care for complex acute medical conditions. We can get all the care we need from our doctors and other providers in a far more cost effective, better experience, more convenient setting with higher quality outcomes than at a hospital or hospital-based outpatient service.

Can you hear the healthcare consumer now?

Michael is a healthcare marketing business, marketing, and communications strategist and thought leader.  As an internationally followed healthcare marketing strategy blogger, his blog, Healthcare Marketing Matters receives over 20,000 page views a month and read in 52 countries.  He is a Fellow, American College of Healthcare Executives, Professional Certified Marketer, American Marketing Association and HubSpot Academy- Email Marketing, Inbound Marketing & Inbound Sales Certified. Post opinions are my own.


For more topics and thought leading discussions like this, join his group, Healthcare Marketing Leaders For Change, a LinkedIn Professional Group.

Sunday, June 4, 2017

Ten Steps to Make Hospital Marketing Sticker.

With all the things that hospital leadership and healthcare marketing executives have on their plates and keeping them up at night, here’s a new one.  And unfortunately, it’s out of one’s control, and no exceptions are allowed.

With the economic shift from a product and service economy to an experience economy, providers are at a clear disadvantage by continuing to market like it is the 1990s.  Now that being said, it’s not all providers, but the vast majority.  

Being paid for the production of care in the fee-for-service model is a product and service approach to healthcare.  Though the payment mechanism is changing, little has changed in provider marketing.  

A vast majority of healthcare providers still taking product marketing features approach. Notice that I did not say features and benefits marketing. Providers only go halfway choosing features or warm fuzzy improbable benefits but not both in their marketing.  I have yet to see a provider or provider system provide me with compelling reasons on the advantages of using them. It’s no wonder then that little differentiation exists in the market resulting in provider marketing that is not sticky.

Nobody remembers the advertisements.  But the healthcare and patient remember what they saw on social media or the Internet. The healthcare consumer is talking and searching for healthcare information to learn and make choices. 

Welcome to the experience economy, where the experience of care trumps the products and services of care.

Now what?

Time for a change.

To grow and thrive in the experience economy while all else is in flames around the hospital or health system, it means moving from traditional marketing to experiential marketing that addresses needs of and meets the experience expectations of the healthcare consumer and patient.

Making provider marketing sticky is all about the care experience and engagement of the person on a very personal level. And given the multitude of ways, one of the most efficient will be social media.

Here are ten new marketing rules in an experience economy for making provider marketing stickier: 
1.       Understand fully and comprehensively the healthcare consumer and person experience. With over 147 touch-points for the customer and patient experience with a hospital. It’s vital in the experience economy that marketing understands what information they are seeking, and deliver it to them at the right experience touch-point with the right call-to-action. 
2.       Content is king. Make it memorable. It’s how you drive engagement through effective and compelling storytelling around the experience of care, not the how of the care.  From the website to Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest, Periscope, etc., focus on the experience. Be visual. Be compelling. 
3.       Identify and work with the leading influencers.  Providers need community influencers to amplify the message through social media. Encourage user generated content. 
4.       Develop testimonials about the experience of care and engagement from patients and healthcare consumers. 
5.       Integrate and communicate the value of the brand, key brand messages and brand promise across all channels. 
6.       Use social media and SEO to amplify your message. Influencer’s and patients providing testimonials need to complete online reviews to raise your placement in Google and other search engine results. 
7.       Integrate the information and experience across all channels and platforms that consumer will use- desktop, smartphone or tablet for a seamless experience. No disconnects. The healthcare consumer moves freely between all three devices expecting the same experience across all three. 
8.       Traditional marketing needs to focus more on the price, outcomes, experience and drive engagement.  No more buildings, smiling doctors, shiny new equipment.  
9.       Teach employees how to use their social media channels to amplify the provider. 
10.   Show the healthcare organization that marketing today is no longer about transactions but value.  Transactions will come after the value is understood.

There is no escaping or slowing down the experience economy as it overtakes healthcare.

Michael is a healthcare marketing business, marketing, and communications strategist and thought leader.  As an internationally followed healthcare marketing strategy blogger, his blog, Healthcare Marketing Matters receives over 20,000 page views a month and read in 52 countries.  He is a Fellow, American College of Healthcare Executives, Professional Certified Marketer, American Marketing Association and HubSpot Academy- Email Marketing, Inbound Marketing & Inbound Sales Certified. Post opinions are my own.


For more topics and thought leading discussions like this, join his group, Healthcare Marketing Leaders For Change, a LinkedIn Professional Group.

Monday, May 15, 2017

Are You Using a Hospital Clinical Service Line Brand Evangelist for Differentiation?

Do you know who your patient hospital brand, evangelists are? I ask this question for a critical reason.  In an age of little provider differentiation in the actual retail medical marketplace with me too messaging, how is a healthcare consumer to make a choice?

Now that being said, I realize that many a health care leader will dispute the above statement.  But the fact is is that there is little if any messaging differentiation.  I knew as I was there too but made a conscious effort to move away from the “me too” messaging. And that was in the early 2000s.

So where am I going with this?

Consumers are demanding price and quality transparency. 

Maybe in reality what they want is more cost certainty and knowing what the value is they are receiving for the dollar paid?  But few in hospitals or health systems are listening to the needs and demands of the healthcare consumer. Then they howl loudly than a third party releases data that is publically available on the hospitals or health systems prices and quality.

Consumers of healthcare are shopping.

Consumers are now paying one-third of the cost of care out of pocket.

An individual uses the internet and social media 41 percent of the time in gathering information to make provider choice.

Consumers no longer rely on word of mouth to choose doctors and hospitals but on the Internet of things and social sharing sites.

And the answer by hospitals and health systems is to market the “trust our expertise” with messages that are full of vague claims and statements.

One way to answer those questions is through the use of patient testimonials, aka the clinical service line brand evangelist. 

Let me give you an example. When at the multihospital health system, I developed The Third Opinion Oncology campaign.  Upon an individual receiving a cancer diagnosis, the next step is the second medical opinion.  But we found that there was a third phase. The patient then talks to everyone and anyone that went through that cancer diagnosis and treatment.

Instead of going to the market with a look at our great oncologists, technology, expertise and it’s all about you messaging we went in a very different direction. The campaign focused on three individuals along common cancer diagnoses of breast, colon, and prostate. By the way, it was hard to find those three brand evangelists. That tells one a lot about the hospital brand and experience too.

The simple message-  “Ask me how I beat breast cancer,”  Jane@hosptial.org with a professional photo of the individual, email, print, billboard and direct mail. Calls and emails went to my RN based call center. Before the campaign launch, a detailed Q&A was developed and conducted with the three individuals, clinicians and oncologists to identify the type of questions they had and the answers.  When a question came in that, we did not have any answer for we went back to the individuals and clinicians for a reply.

The entire campaign pulled the consumer to the hospital, pushed through to the oncologist, then pulled the oncologist to the hospital.

I did not message quality, technology, drugs, surgery; we care about you or anything else. I didn't say best and brightest; it’s all about you, or we are the only choices. Those are arrogant and pejorative vague claims that are indefensible. One message that was clear and unambiguous offer a solution to a serious medical situation bu providing alternatives and choices by clearly answering health-related consumer questions that are life and death in nature.

Use of a patient brand evangelist clearly differentiated the systems oncology services and established a position in the market that no other provider could claim.  The campaign drove appropriate utilization, built the oncologist practices and increased hospital revenue, market share and brand awareness.

And all of that was before a change in the market that is becoming retail medical in nature.  Today the stake are even higher, and the hospital or health system brand needs to mean more than ever.

The hospital of 2017  operates in a market that is more value and risk than fee-for-service. And where the consumer has a growing portion of the expense and choice of providers brand and value is everything.

Changing your marketing today from ambiguous we are all the same features and benefits marketing to patient brand evangelists and solutions marketing, will set one up for success whatever the payment system is.  A strong established brand will be in narrow networks, the provider of choice in consumer-driven exchange plans and the dominant provider in the market.

What one does today in creating an indelible hospital or system brand will impact tomorrow's the growth, revenue, and profitability.

Is it that hard to be responsive to a consumer's need for healthcare problem solutions? 

Michael is a healthcare marketing business, marketing, and communications strategist and thought leader.  As an internationally followed healthcare marketing strategy blogger, his blog, Healthcare Marketing Matters receives over 20,000 page views a month and read in 52 countries.  He is a Fellow, American College of Healthcare Executives, Professional Certified Marketer, American Marketing Association and HubSpot Academy- Email Marketing, Inbound Marketing & Inbound Sales Certified. Post opinions are my own.

For more topics and thought leading discussions like this, join his group, Healthcare Marketing Leaders For Change, a LinkedIn Professional Group.

Sunday, April 30, 2017

10 Essential Steps for Provider Marketing to Create Effective Email Engagement

Email

I can see your eyes glaze over.  And I can hear the chorus of but…but…HIPAA says we can’t do that, which is just nonsense. If understood correctly, a hospital can manage the marketing of clinical services with cost efficiency and effectiveness and handle the engagement or experience for the provider. It’s cost effective and efficient with an ROI that is over 4,200 percent.

From providing useful and relevant information, wellness programs like webinars and marketing hospital outpatient as well as inpatient clinical services, it’s one of the few mechanisms that hospitals can control in the market.  It’s a marketing tool to build brand loyalty, enhance the experience, and engage while driving growth and revenue.

For example, a clueless hospital system.

The hospital system that is the network in my insurance plan has never once engaged me in an email, social media or any other inbound tactic to engage and manage the healthcare consumer or patient experience. Even though I have used them, as well as my wife and family, the system has no clue regarding me or who we are as a family.  The provider system still focuses entirely on interruptive outbound mass marketing with the non-targeted shouting look at us making baseless claims, and non-needed services marketing like ads, and radio commercials all the while opening brick and mortar facilities in areas that over saturated and where the population is already existing primary care physician relationships.

But then, I do everything possible in my power to use more cost-efficient and higher quality providers that are far more convenient, cost-effective and provide a better quality experience to me that any system hospital-based services.

Don’t you think the system might want to engage me?

Better than outbound interruptive marketing where your messages are simply broadcast to the widest possible audience in the hopes that someone will respond, email can be a part of your inbound hospital marketing program.

But it just not a mail merge program to put a name at the topAnd it’s not buying an email list either. 

A word of caution is in order. Never buy an email list.  These people have not consented to receive an email from you.  Purchased lists damage the brand for that matter, end up in the junk folder or marked as spam. At some point in time, the Internet Service Providers will flag your emails as spam, impacting your ability to send emails.  

And emails marked as spam and unopened will eventually affect the deliverability of the email.

And I know a few who think that by asking people to whitelist their email address, that will solve the problem. A temporary fix at best, they need to repair the content, design, and CTAs to make them more responsive to the receiver.

There are plenty of touch-points in the hospital experience that can be used to obtain their email address and have the healthcare consumer or patient opt-in to receiving emails.

What next?

In the interest of blog readability, I won’t go into all the detail of how to create a successful healthcare hospital email program.  But what I will do is provide some useful tips for creating an engaging email and email program.

10 Steps to start the journey to an engaging email program.

1.       Start with a primary goal. Deliveries, clicks, and opens are metrics, not goals.   What do you want the email to accomplish? Send someone to their patient portal? Attend a wellness webinar?  Download some useful information? Attend a wellness program? Make the goal measurable.
2.       Write the copy. One of the few controllable factors in an email by the marketer is the copy. But structure and design are crucial, and it doesn’t matter how great the copy is if the design is all wrong. Every point of text should support the goal.
3.       Write for scan-ability. Use the right tone. Personalize when appropriate. Proof read, proof read and then proofread some more.
4.       Use the inverted pyramid structure to - grab attention, build anticipation, call-to-action.
5.       Have only one call-to-action (CTA).  You may have several links in an email, but each link must lead to where you want the reader to go.  Multiple CTAs confuse the reader and result in inaction.  But in case you just can’t help yourself with multiple CTAs stack your content.  In the event of emails, the choice is not okay. The only difference is a newsletter, but that is a subject for another time.
6.       Design creates a consistent user experience for everyone who receives your email. The design also helps to remove the friction in delivering your email. You have the opportunity to leverage branding and recognition to capture the reader’s attention. Use headers and sub-headers, font bolding, italics, numbers or colored text, but do not underline.  Be deliberate about the top 25 percent of your content.
7.       Reduce information density and add white space.  White space is good. Use a single column layout.
8.       Email design and web design are different. While there are only a few common web browsers, there are thousands of email clients. Each email client will render your email differently. Make sure you provide a link to an online version.  600 pixels is the ideal width. Stay away from HTML/CSS-based positioning and stick to table-structured positioning.  Add alt text to your images. Avoid creating emails as a single image and don’t use background images. Remember to define the width and height of your images. Oh and don’t use multiple images.  I know people say that they like images, but the data proves otherwise. The more images you have in an email, the fewer opens and clicks.  This one does not design around what the consumer says, but a design based on what the data shows how they act.
9.       Now really pay attention here. Create the email for mobile.  That’s right design it for mobile.  Here’s why: 54 percent of emails are viewed and opened on mobile; 81 percent of smartphone users say reading email is an activity that they use mobile for the most, and 41 percent say they want emails readable on mobile devices. (Source: Experian, OFOMC4, DMA) Think about how you use your smartphone. Looking at emails between meetings or a restaurant etc. people may not always be sitting behind desktops all day either.  Less is more and designing your email for mobile as it makes you explain the idea with greater clarity and gets you to the point faster.
10.   Use mobile-friendly templates.  The call-to-action should be above the fold; Navigation goes in the footer. User 14 point type. The call-to-action should be 44 by 44 pixels.

There is a lot here in creating a successful inbound email marketing campaign. But this is a good start.  If anything, it may give the system pause and hopefully reconsider its been doing for the last 20 years or so.

Oh, and don’t forget the marketing automation system like Eloqua or Marketo for example.  Without it, your email marketing will fail.

Michael is a healthcare marketing business, marketing, and communications strategist and thought leader.  As an internationally followed healthcare marketing strategy blogger, his blog, Healthcare Marketing Matters receives over 20,000 page views a month and read in 52 countries.  He is a Fellow, American College of Healthcare Executives, Professional Certified Marketer, American Marketing Association and HubSpot Academy- Email Marketing, Inbound Marketing & Inbound Sales Certified. Post opinions are my own.


For more topics and thought leading discussions like this, join his group, Healthcare Marketing Leaders For Change, a LinkedIn Professional Group.

Sunday, April 16, 2017

14 Steps for Crisis Communications in an Age of Social Media & Customers as the Paparazzi

I am not going to pile on United, though they have had a bad few weeks with two full-blown public relations crisis’s in social media in the last three weeks.  But it does make one wonder if United has any capacity to learn from their mistakes given the flow of events and missteps of the past few days.

Are you paying attention?

If companies are not paying attention, especially hospital and health systems, on how the public is the paparazzi, then they can expect sooner rather than later,  that they will experience a meltdown of the provider brand and reputation through their carelessness and folly.

What happens when the social media channel turns bad on the hospital or health system?

Conventional wisdom used to say that a public relations crisis were a three-day story. Ten years ago that was the case.  Today, however, it’s a different story with social media, Facebook live and any of the other distribution channels now available.  Before, a PR crisis could be contained locally or regionally. Now with live video and social media streaming, it can become a global crisis in a mere matter of minutes.



I am not minimizing in any fashion the seriousness of what is taking place. It’s to get one’s attention. Sometimes it becomes way too easy to panic. And that needs to be avoided at all costs. Just ask United.

Take these steps to mitigate the social media communications crisis to protect the brand and organizational reputation. Many of the steps are parallel and not sequential.

The 14 steps for a public relations crisis driven by the consumer paparazzi and social media:

1.)    Do treat this as a communications failure and have a social media crisis communications plan already in place. 
2.)    Care, concern, and compassion still rule the message and the days that follow. 
3.)    Don’t jump right to the “we followed policy and staff acted appropriately.”  That makes you tone deaf and unresponsive. Plus those kinds of remarks will just further add more combustible fuel to the raging fire. 
4.)    Don’t change your message or position every day. You will look foolish and unprepared. 
5.)    Understand what happened and why. 
6.)     Identify who the influencers will be to add voice and impact the conversation. 
7.)    Actively monitor your online reputation. 
8.)    Avoid the informational black hole.  Be ready with appropriate information and press statements.  You can’t hold a news conference every time you want to say something. 
9.)    Have social media appropriate messaging that is clear and concise.
10.) Integrate your response across all social media activities. Remember that some reporters use Twitter as a basis for information and facts without verifying the authenticity of the information. 
11.) If the organization blew it, take ownership.  No excuses, the appearances of excuses or rude behavior are allowed.  Social media users are a pretty savvy group and will see right through it. It will only make matters worse.  
12.) Integrate paid and earned media.  
13.) Have clear rules of social media engagement by employees.   
14.)  Don’t forget to use your staff and their access to social media and how they can influence the conversation.  Employees are your secret weapon in this battle.

And lastly, learn from United. Hundreds of millions of dollars in lost equity and capitalization with a negative brand reputation that will take years to recover. Here is hoping that a social media crisis never comes to your doorstep.

But you can always call me when it does. Have the checkbook ready too
.
Michael is a healthcare marketing business, marketing, and communications strategist and thought leader.  As an internationally followed healthcare marketing strategy blogger, his blog, Healthcare Marketing Matters receives over 20,000 page views a month and read in 52 countries.  He is a Fellow, American College of Healthcare Executives, Professional Certified Marketer, American Marketing Association and HubSpot Academy- Email Marketing, Inbound Marketing & Inbound Sales Certified. Post opinions are my own.

For more topics and thought leading discussions like this, join his group, Healthcare Marketing Leaders For Change, a LinkedIn Professional Group.

Sunday, April 2, 2017

Has Influencer Marketing’s Time Arrived for Providers?

Influencer marketing is generating a lot of attention.  Unfortunately, there seems to be a lot of activity but the little strategy behind the marketing. Oh, and let me be clear before going much further,  that I do not mean hiring celebrities to be the spokesperson for the providers B2C marketing.

Hiring a celebrity to be the spokesperson the hospital or health system can be an expensive and risky proposition. Not everyone in the entertainment segment or sport they represent may have a large enough following in your market.

What is influencer marketing?

Simply put, a person of influence can effect action.  Fans, friends, and followers are meaningless; it’s not about going after the most famous person. It’s about finding the influencer who can best move your audience to take action that brings benefit to you and them.  An influencer may be an industry expert. It may be someone internally. 

Think of influencer marketing as a relationship that co-creates meaningful content within a strategic marketing plan with defined goals that is measurable. Influencer marketing is not creating isolated pieces of content or campaigns. You want to build respective value beyond compensation.

Influencer marketing missteps to avoid.

There has been a limited effort to date on providers part in using influencer marketing. But from what I have seen, here are five things to avoid.  

1.       One-off campaigns: Using influencers once then abandoning the effort only to start again does little to change or influence the potential healthcare consumer. You must aim for sustainability. 
2.       Don’t focus on celebrities. Stars granted have a broad audience, but they are hard to reach, expensive to activate and may not be the most relevant. 
3.       Using Influence marketing for ads only: Sure the endorsement looks great in the ad, and it makes the board and doctors happy. But, is that driving the healthcare consumer to you? Doubtful. You need to co-create content and let the influencer step out and work on your behalf. 
4.       Pay-to-Play: I am not saying that you should not pay influencers. But what I am saying is that if the only value exchange between you and the influencer is cash, and you are not co-creating great content; then there is no mutual benefit. The benefit is one-sided, theirs. 
5.       Not measuring the right metrics: You can measure the business value of influencer marketing, not just social media engagements and brand lift. Start with the right goals and metrics to measure these aims.

What you need to in influencer marketing. 

1.       Have an adequate budget. It’s important to understand the opportunity for return on investment. What does it cost to implement the program measured against the cost of losing access to the top influencers in your market when the competition gets there first.  Think about it as a program, not unique projects. Long-term relationships create the most value for your spend. 
2.       Follow the insight.  That means doing your market research to understand the hospitals market and identify those influencers who can affect change and move the market. Don’t guess, know. 
3.       Identify the top influencer marketing goals. The influencer marketing program is about ROI, not brand lift and awareness. Make sure your goals and the influencers goals are in alignment. 
4.       Identify what areas are most impacted by influencer marketing. Social media marketing and content marketing are your best areas. Remember that social media is a baseline. Look to your make your program highly integrated across the organization and commercialization channels. The healthcare consumer is omnichannel which means that your influencer marketing needs to be omnichannel as well.

It is easy to get started in influencer marketing. From those first steps, you can grow your efforts in creating a sustainable long-term program built on relationships and moving markets.

Remember influencer marketing is additive, not exclusive, and long-term not short-term.
Influencer marketing’s time has come for providers, but it’s not celebrity driven, and one-off campaigns.  It’s about long-term beneficial relationships that create value for sustained success.

Michael is a healthcare marketing business, marketing, and communications strategist and thought leader.  As an internationally followed healthcare marketing strategy blogger, his blog, Healthcare Marketing Matters receives over 20,000 page views a month and read in 52 countries.  He is a Fellow, American College of Healthcare Executives, Professional Certified Marketer, American Marketing Association and HubSpot Academy- Email Marketing, Inbound Marketing & Inbound Sales Certified. Post opinions are my own.


For more topics and thought leading discussions like this, join his group, Healthcare Marketing Leaders For Change, a LinkedIn Professional Group.

Sunday, March 26, 2017

Can Health Care in The U.S. Be Reformed?

No.

Not with the health care delivery system and financing model that exists.

Tinkering around the edges and playing the little Dutch boy putting his fingers in holes in the dike to stop the water accomplishes nothing and doesn’t work. We find time and time again; this is the direction elected officials at all levels and policy wonks take while listening to the lobbyists for the different provider and insurer groups, who are more concerned about increasing their share of the trillion dollar health care industry than they are about patients.

I have worked in healthcare with the introduction of DRGs in 1983.

I have worked in healthcare during the 1990s and HMOs, capitation payment systems, the employment of physicians, the formation of health systems, provider driven insurance plans, etc.

I have worked in healthcare during the 2000s when the cost of medical care skyrocketed; the ACA was passed because nothing from the tinkering and experience of the previous 20 years worked.

I work and watch in healthcare during the 2010s, as we revisit the failed models of the 1990s and 2000s.

And here we are nearly 40 years later, with the same problems only bigger and more expensive.

We continue to “reform” a health care delivery system and financing model that is unsustainable.

This is just craziness.

The following is not a political statement but an observation.

For seven years we have heard the loud carrion cry of Conservatives doing the repeal and replace ACA dance. Now given a chance after all that wailing and whining the Republicans were: 1) never ready with any replacement; 2) incapable of articulating a coherent health care policy, delivery and financing model; and 3) are incapable of governing given a chance. Some old song. Same old story. Same old Washington.

The question is and always been, for which there has never been the national dialogue, is health care a privilege or a right? Then comes the consideration that also requires a national debate, how do we pay for care?

It’s not a matter of reform of the reimbursement models. It’s a matter of needing to change the health care delivery and financing model entirely.

Both parties only tinker around the edges bringing about unintended consequences that only make matters worse and solve nothing.

Understand that people have always gotten care, of which the cost of care was off-loaded onto the backs of healthcare providers, meaning doctors and hospitals. It is the medicalization of a societal issue. People do get care; it may be in an inappropriate care setting (ER) and at the wrong time, but care nonetheless.

Until the healthcare delivery and finance model is addressed at its root failure cause, and an honest national discussion is held, nothing more will happen except for the wild back and forth political swings of both parties.

Michael is a healthcare business, marketing, and communications executive, strategist and thought leader.  As an internationally followed healthcare marketing strategy blogger, his blog, Healthcare Marketing Matters receives over 20,000 page views a month and read in 52 countries.  He is a Fellow, American College of Healthcare Executives, Professional Certified Marketer, American Marketing Association and HubSpot Academy- Email Marketing, Inbound Marketing & Inbound Sales Certified. Post opinions are my own.

For more topics and thought leading discussions like this, join his group, Healthcare Marketing Leaders For Change, a LinkedIn Professional Group.

Sunday, March 12, 2017

Provider’s, calculating RMOI on your marketing efforts? No, well here’s how.

With so many changes in the healthcare market and resource constraints in hospitals, it’s a wonder they attempt any marketing at all. As much has healthcare has changed, provider marketing just hasn’t kept up. In hospitals saying your brand awareness is up is essentially a waste of marketing resources.

Big deal.

Your outcomes, patient satisfaction, price, experience and preventable death rate tell another story which negates the undifferentiated all about you feel good marketing. The healthcare consumer and patient isn’t dumb you know. They see the numbers and can figure it out.

What must I do?

To do Return on Marketing Investment analysis, you must market something that is measurable. Surprise!  Brand ads just won’t do it. It won’t tell you what to sell and how, as that is not the focus of the blog post. If you can’t figure it out then maybe it’s time for a different profession.

Moving forward.

Below is an example of an actual ROMI computation for a multi-hospital organization. I am assuming that you can identify and pull down the information that you need across many platforms of the organization to produce such a result.  If you can’t measure, then broaden your technological capability and move towards a higher level of computerization and system integration that you already experience.

The role finance plays.

Work with your finance department. They are a great source of information. With a high degree of collaboration and understanding their viewpoints and perspectives regarding marketing, you can lead and make a difference. By answering questions, concerns and opinions with solid data, you can move the discussion from marketing does “stuff’ to marketing is a financial contributor to the organization.

The formula and method.

The way forward below can be adapted to any campaign and provides you with the data fields, and logical analysis one needs.  This is an actual RMOI calculation on a physician referral campaign and call center.

PRCC ROI

An analysis was undertaken to look at the ROI of the Physician Referral Call Center. The study matched a database of call center name records for the period to financial records which had already been downloaded.  The data produced the following results:

*      9,102 call records were matched with utilization and financial data.
*      9,102 calls led to a total of 9,121 encounters in the ER, Inpatient and Outpatient categories of service.
*      751 contacts were ER
o   177 returning encounters
o   573 first time encounters
*      1,105 contacts were Inpatient
o    530 returning encounters
o    699 first time encounters
*      7,267 were Outpatient
o   2,014 returning encounters
o   5,253 first time encounters
*      Total charges for all encounters equaled $22,522,649
*      Charges for new encounters all services totaled $16,085,198 or 71 percent of the total charges
*      Average charge per ER Encounter  $1,304
*      Average charge per  Inpatient Encounter $13,581
*      Average charge per Outpatient Encounter  $903
*      Gallup measures loyalty at 68 percent (would return for service) which means that for every 100 patients 32 would not return for care- therefore:
o   ED- 57 returning encounters captured that would not have returned
o   Inpatient – 170 returning patients that would not have returned
o   Outpatient- 645 returning visits that would not have returned
*      Incremental charges counted returning consumers not loyal
o   ER - $74,337
o   Inpatient- $2,308,851
o   Outpatient-  $582,505
o   Subtotal charges counted:  $2,965,693
*      Overall market share in primary and secondary service area is 14.53 percent. The number of first-time encounters has utilized us above market presence is, therefore:
o   ER 573 first time visits,  83 not countered, 490 counted –
o   Inpatient – 699 first time admissions, 101 not used,  598 admissions used
o   Outpatient – 5,253 first time encounters, 763 encounters not counted, 4,490 counted
*      Based on an overall market share of  14.5  percent the  incremental charges counted for new  encounters, not because of market presence:
o   ER - $638,960
o   Inpatient – $8,121,438
o   Outpatient –  $4,054,470
*      Total Charges counted: $12,814,868
*      Discount from gross charges for Medicare, Medicaid, Managed Care, Bad Debt and Charity Care @ 65% is $8,326,644
*      Net Revenue:  $4,488,224
*      PRCC program costs:  $233,410
*      Net contribution:  $4,254,814
*      ROI 18.22:1

Much is written and made of the importance of calculating a Return on Marketing Investment (ROMI) for healthcare organizations.  Most often regulated to producing brochures and other items, healthcare marketing departments need to exercise a leadership position and talk the financial language of senior management.

Otherwise, marketing is just a cost center and not an organizational asset.

Michael is a healthcare marketing business, marketing, and communications strategist and thought leader.  As an internationally followed healthcare marketing strategy blogger, his blog, Healthcare Marketing Matters receives over 20,000 page views a month and read in 52 countries.  He is a Fellow, American College of Healthcare Executives, Professional Certified Marketer, American Marketing Association and HubSpot Academy- Email Marketing, Inbound Marketing & Inbound Sales Certified. Post opinions are my own.


For more topics and thought leading discussions like this, join his group, Healthcare Marketing Leaders For Change, a LinkedIn Professional Group.